Cultural Snapshot: 4 Things Found in Nantes [5]

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Here is another install­ment of the “things found in Nantes” series, with the lat­est pictures!

Le Paradis (for fast-food lovers)

Le Paradis (for fast-food lovers)

When foreigners think of French food, they usually picture huge loaves of bread, fancy dishes (invariably with a side of green beans and mysterious—and equally fancy—sauce), elaborated pastries, smelly cheese… but definitely not burgers and fries. Yet, kebab and sandwich joints are very popular among locals. This one promises “le Paradis” with €3 burgers, €4 panini (Italian-style grilled sandwiches, usually stuffed with cheese, meat and tomatoes) and €6 kebab menus (meat sandwich with a side of fries and a can of soda).

French wines in a Bar à vin

French wines in a Bar à vin

Wine is cheap in France, you can find bottles for around €2 at the supermarket, although I’m not sure if it’s drinkable or if it’s just piquette  (a somewhat wine-like beverage). I find glass bottles and their inventive labels fascinating, although I really don’t like the taste of wine. Don’t ask me to pick a bottle. Just don’t. Unless you like vinegar.

An old Magasin d'alimentation

An old Magasin d’alimentation

Some days, I feel like I walked on every single street in Nantes, yet I always find something that catches my eyes. The other day I noticed this old magasin d’alimentation (grocery store) sign left on a building, right by Decré-Lafayette. I think there are apartments upstairs but the downstairs is the long-closed small business. The épicerie de quartier would have never survived the arrival of modern and fancier supermarkets, but I like the idea of an old couple selling bread and other basic stuff to passers-by behind a street-level open window, like in these small almacenes in Central America.

Lame word play

Lame word play

French love word plays and l’anglais, a language often seen as “edgy” and “modern”. Unfortunately, they tend to butcher the Queen’s English and most franglais jokes are only understood… by French speakers. This bar’s name is “au Plaisir”, which can mean “pleased to see you” or “nice seeing you again” and it kind of sound like “au plaiz’here”… which, of course, doesn’t actually mean anything in English.

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French woman in English Canada. World citizen, new mom, traveler, translator, writer and photographer. Looking for comrades to start a new revolution.

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