Heads or Tails in Buenos Aires

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Life in Buenos Aires is like a game of heads or tails—assuming you find a coin to flip, change is hard to get.

Heads. Beautiful day, blue sky, a stroll in a relaxing barrio like San Telmo or posh Recoleta, a coffee with medialunas, wide, paved streets, a very European feel, culture and art at your fingertips, a relaxing evening out. Tails. Narrow streets jam-packed with cars, buses and taxis, garbage piling up on the sidewalks, rats and cockroaches peeking out of manhole covers, touts promoting tacky tourist attractions at every street corner, police everywhere, nothing works, everything is fuera de servicio, it’s pouring rain and streets are flooded.

Buenos Aires is that place where you can score a four-star hotel for $60, a clean room with crisp, white bedsheets in a convenient location in the microcentro. Buenos Aires is also the place where you can book a hotel with a pompous name, like the Gran Argentino or Gran something, and end up in a dark dusty room with stained carpet, antique elevators, and no water pressure in the shower.

Over the years, we wised up and we learned the fine art of booking hotel rooms in Buenos Aires. However, we have no control over the many annoyances that can occur—the traffic, the chaos, the major or minor idiosyncrasies of the country’s capital.

It’s just part of Buenos Aires. Gotta accept it.

Overall, we were pretty lucky during this three-day stay. Buenos Aires can be a very rewarding city for travellers. There are places to visit, landmarks to enjoy and if you embrace it, you can have fun.

We walked around our favourite barrios—San Telmo for the Sunday Market, La Recoleta for the Cementerio and Evita’s grave, the microcentro for the nightlife along the busy avenue Corriente, Lavalle and Florida streets, Palermo, Puerto Madero … we even walked to Once, a recurring joke because like we said, we would only do it once. It turned out to be an interesting neighbourhood, very diverse and colourful. In front of the train station, there was a small protest and a massive police presence with armoured vehicles, water guns and armed riot-control cops in full gear. I looked at the small gathering—their banner read “work for everyone”—and at the police surrounding them. “Jesus … that’s a bit of an overreaction,” I noted. “Come on, there are like fifty people at most, they aren’t even marching, and half of Buenos Aires police force showed up!”

We crossed Avenida 9 de Julio—the widest in the world—many, many times and stood by the 67-metre-tall obelisk on the oval Plaza de la República. We visited the Museo del Bicentenario, housed within the brick vaults of the old aduana (customs house) and dedicated to Argentina’s tumultuous political history—unlike in Chile, little was said about the Dirty War era. We checked out the Catedral Metropolitana, the Galerías Pacífico, stepped on the Corbeta Uruguay—a 46m-long military ship docked in Puerto Madero—and enjoy the air con at the Mercado de Abasto.

And then, once again, we said goodbye to Buenos Aires.

It was just a stop on the road. Time to take the bus and go somewhere else.

 

Plaza de Mayo, Banco de la Nación Argentina

Plaza de Mayo, Casa Rosada, the executive mansion and office of the President of Argentina

Museo Del Bicentenario

Political sticker in Buenos Aires

Cementerio de la Recoleta

Cementerio de la Recoleta

Cementerio de la Recoleta

Grave of Eva Perón in the Cementerio de la Recoleta

Grave of Eva Perón in the Cementerio de la Recoleta

The official exchange rate

In memory of one of the desaparecidos of the Dirty War in Recoleta

Plaza Italia, Mark offering me “flowers”

Buenos Aires subte

Buenos Aires subte

Buenos Aires subte

Buenos Aires subte

Buenos Aires subte entrance on 9 de Julio

“Out of service” in a 25 Horas convenience store

From the Corbeta Uruguay in Perto Madero

From the Corbeta Uruguay in Perto Madero

Cartoon in a lavandaria, the pairs of socks remind themselves to stay with their spouse

Souvenir keychains on Lavalle

Congreso de la Nación Argentina

Crumbled banknotes are not accepted

The obelisk from Av. Pres. Roque Sáenz Peña

Traffic in the microcentro

Hot in Buenos Aires

Football “stadium” in an abandoned lot in Once

Galerías Pacífico

Downpour in Buenos Aires, Calle Lavalle

Downpour in Buenos Aires, Calle Lavalle

Calle Florida

Corrientes, the theatre district

Avenida 9 de Julio

Avenida 9 de Julio

Plaza de la República

Plaza de la República

Plaza de la República

Plaza de la República

Avenida 9 de Julio

Crazy night traffic (long exposure) on 9 de Julio

Corriente by night

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About Author

French woman in English Canada. World citizen, new mom, traveler, translator, writer and photographer. Looking for comrades to start a new revolution.

2 Comments

  1. Love the colorful painted subway pillars!

    It’s funny how cities start to resemble each other with their obelisks and plazas. A closer look at the architecture, billboards, and buses reveal their differences, but with a cursory glance I’m reminded of New York and Paris.

    • Buenos Aires really feels like Paris. Many Argentinians came from Europe, especially Italy and Spain, and this is one of the most European cities in Latin America. Other Argentinian cities are different, though.

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