How To Learn More About Canada (10/10)

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Welcome To Canada! Wel­come to my new “How To… Canada” series! In this series, I’ll try to put my knowl­edge to good use and shed some light on my new coun­try: Canada. You will learn how some immi­gra­tion tips and tricks, how to improve your pro­fi­ciency in both offi­cial lan­guages, how to find a job, how to set­tle in Canada etc. I’ll pub­lish a new “How To… Canada” post every Saturday.

To con­clude this series, I’d like to share with you some online resources about Canada. Canada at your fin­ger­tips, with­out the cold and the wind­chill!

The Media: TV, news­pa­pers and mag­a­zines

Immi­grate to Canada

  • The Min­istry of Cit­i­zen­ship & Immi­gra­tion is the only offi­cial immi­gra­tion resource. You may down­load your visa appli­ca­tions here.
  • Immi­gra­tion Québec: if you wish to visit, study or set­tle in Québec, you may use the provin­cial government’s website.
  • Loon­lounge offers com­mu­nity sup­port to future immi­grants. I’m an “expert” on this forum, designed to answer any ques­tion you may have regard­ing vis­it­ing, study­ing or set­tling in Canada.
  • The Expat Forum is also a great resource to share tips about Canada.

The Cana­dian Blogosphere

  • A New Life In Canada, by Aiglee: a cou­ple from Venezuela set­tles in Toronto. Aiglee blogs in Eng­lish and in Span­ish about her new life up North.
  • Johnada (+ wife and new­born Esme) is from the USA and now lives in Toronto. Watch for his Moslon rat­ing system!
  • Although not an immi­grant (well, she is from Van­cou­ver!) , Gail is a tal­ented pho­tog­ra­pher who shares snap­shots of Toronto, where she lives, and the world in general.
  • On the other side of the coun­try, Expat Trav­eler, orig­i­nally from Switzer­land, blogs about her life in Vancouver.
  • The Prairie Road is the story of an Amer­i­can fam­ily who moved in a small town, in Saskatchewan.
  • Los Zieglers In Canada is the story of a fam­ily of 6 (well, 5 + the dog) from Argentina who moved to Ottawa. The blog, writ­ten by Guillermo, is in Span­ish, but full of tips and fun sto­ries. Guillermo speaks Eng­lish flu­ently so don’t be scared to com­ment in this lan­guage (like myself, when I’m lazy!).

Misc. Resources

I hope you enjoyed this “How to… Canada” series. If you have more ques­tions about my new coun­try, please, don’t hes­i­tate to con­tact me!

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About Author

French woman in English Canada. World citizen, new mom, traveler, translator, writer and photographer. Looking for comrades to start a new revolution.

14 Comments

  1. I had taken an oath to immi­grate to Canada in the sad event that the Repub­li­cans were re-elected in the USofA. For­tu­nately that will not be nec­ces­sary for at least 4 more years. I still want to know more about you guys, so I will read this with inter­est any­way. Thanks for your cool blog.

  2. Ohh! I can not believe you have suc­cess­fully com­pleted “How to… Canada” series. It used to be so infor­ma­tive; never felt it will end soon.

    But Thanks for shar­ing. You are sim­ply great help to everyone!

  3. I feel hon­oured to be men­tioned in your Cana­dian Blo­gos­phere list!

    As a bonus, I am actu­ally an immigrant :)

    My fam­ily came to Canada in 1974, when I was very young. I remem­ber tak­ing the oath as a child in Win­nipeg; my father filmed the cer­e­mony. I took the oath again in Cal­gary in 1991 because my friend lost my pass­port AND cer­tifi­cate of cit­i­zen­ship in Banff and I needed to replace both quickly!

    As an immi­grant, a for­mer expat sev­eral times over, and hav­ing resided in five Cana­dian provinces, I am def­i­nitely a “Cana­dian by choice”. Times were very hard for my fam­ily in the begin­ning — they moved to Saskatchewan at the begin­ning of win­ter and had never seen snow. They immi­grated as farm work­ers and lived in their spon­sors’ barn on an iso­lated prop­erty, with no friends or fam­ily nearby. It was mod­ern slav­ery, but with help from other farm­ers they escaped and the rest is history…

    I love to hear other people’s sto­ries of becom­ing “Cana­dian by choice”. Keep up the good work!

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