Sunday Market

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On Sundays, all the stores are closed but a couple of bakeries and a bunch of bars (French can’t live without a supply of booze). Even though these quiet Sundays are kind of a recurring event and a tradition in France, most people still need to shop on Sunday—a baguette, a few slices of jambon blanc, a roasted chicken, maybe some deli specialties like a good portion of taboulé, pâté or other charcuterie. So, people go to the nearest market. Even in large cities like Nantes, producers come from all over the region to sell their fruits and vegetables, and they add to the smaller daily market.

These days, going to the market is almost a political act. Buying local, buying organic, buying less and buying better quality products in general is the trend. However, doing so has a price. Contrary to popular belief, markets aren’t cheap. In fact, supermarkets are almost always cheaper but for a few specialty items.

It’s a great place for people watching and to take picture of food, though, and to immerse yourself into the culture. I hadn’t seen that much seafood in a long time!

You can find all the pic­ture in the France 2015 set.

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Marché Talensac

Kiwis and Peaches

Kiwis and Peaches

Cherries

Cherries

Lemons and Berries

Lemons and Berries

Lemons and Cantaloupes

Lemons and Cantaloupes

Peaches

Peaches

Oysters

Oysters

Crayfishes

Crayfishes

Winkles

Winkles

Fish Stalls

Fish Stalls

Deli

Deli

Wine Seller

Wine Seller

Cantaloupes and Tomatoes

Cantaloupes and Tomatoes

Artichokes

Artichokes

Bananas

Bananas

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About Author

French woman in English Canada. World citizen, new mom, traveler, translator, writer and photographer. Looking for comrades to start a new revolution.

20 Comments

  1. So jealous of the price of cherries, they are 8,99 to 9,99 Euros in most Parisian supermarkets. I don’t shop at my local market because they are not selling local produces and they wares are not any better than what I can find in a regular supermarket.

    I’ve always found produces at markets outside of Paris of better quality!

    • Where do you shop in Paris? I often find there isn’t much choice, between these tiny overpriced épiceries and the Monoprix.

  2. I was wondering about price comparison between Europe and Canada, do you think the food is generally more expensive here in Europe, for example seasonal fruit?
    When I was visiting in North America what struck me the most was the fact that some stores are open 24/7, so to avoid crowds some people will actually go grocery shopping in the middle of the night! To me that was beyond weird as it is so different to Europe where stores close at 8-9pm, and on Sundays most stores are generally closed. All night shopping in America is certainly convenient however I can’t say I see this happening in Europe any time soon, what do you think?

    • Fruits and veggies are definitely cheaper (and bigger!) in North America, especially bananas and “exotic” fruits. I was super curious to see who shopped in the middle of the night when I first came to Ottawa, so I once went to the supermarket at 2 a.m. It was pretty empty, employees mostly stock up and arrange deliveries. Most people still seem to shop within fairly regular business hours, i.e. until 8 p.m. or 9 p.m. I don’t think I go to the supermarket later than that (I usually go around noon when it’s quiet, the perks of freelancing!). It’s convenient to know stores are open but we rarely use this convenience.

      I wouldn’t mind shops to be open on Sundays in France and I can see the trend picking up. Now some grocery stores open 9-12 on Sundays, which was unthinkable just a few years ago. But 24/7… not a chance.

      • Very interesting that the fruit & veggies seems to be bigger on the other side of the Atlantic, probably due to completely different supply chain. Having spent a few weeks in North America I have to admit I was in complete awe with some of the conveniences over there. We once went to run a few errands and barely got out of the car as it was all drive-through – such a contrast to Europe where for much of the time people just walk if at all possible:) enjoy your holidays & looking forward to see more pics from your travels

        • Take bananas for instance: French seem to import them from Guadeloupe and Martinique, the two French islands in the Caribbeans, while in Canada they come from Honduras. And they taste very different!

  3. I especially like the photo of lines of raspberries and lemons! I go to outdoor markets in phases. Sometimes I go for a long time without visiting one because it’s easier to get everything at the supermarket, but once in a while when I have time and the idea, I’ll go regularly for a few weeks.

  4. Lovely photos! I also find that farmers’ markets here in Ottawa are more expensive than the grocery store – tough call, local produce and better flavour, or lower cost? Different sides win out from week to week. 🙂

    • Which market do you go to in Ottawa? I used to go to the one in the Byward, but it has gotten expensive and sometime, the quality of produce was disappointing (like rotten bell peppers).

  5. Les cerises font envie, mais alors le prix!!!! Mamamia j’ai perdu l’habitude. Ici toutes les choses fraîches surtout au marché sont au moins la moitié de ce que c’est dans l’hémisphère Nord… (quoique si j’ai envie de cerises il me faudra sûrement payer un bras et un oeil pour un produit importé et super moche) hi hi

    • Je sais… l’Amérique latine a les meilleurs fruits. Par contre, les légumes me manquaient en Argentine! Le Brésil a de tout, c’est génial.

    • I love NPR, thank you for the link! I agree, I find it a bit creepy when produce (or bread or anything like that) looks perfect. It feels… artificial.

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