Home » On The Road » Estación México » The Lost Ruinas of Uxmal

The Lost Ruinas of Uxmal

Ok, maybe not “lost” ruinas. After all, Uxmal is a pretty big archae­o­log­i­cal site. But some­how, we had always skipped it.

Armed with maps, a cou­ple of sodas and the paci­fier (daddy’s best friend to make sure the ride is rel­a­tively peace­ful, bonus points if Mark actu­ally naps), we left Mérida and drove to Uxmal. The town, right out­side the city, was big­ger than we had expected and we soon faced a dilemma at the main plaza: which road was the right one?

I got off the car and asked a taxi dri­ver. He replied like most Lati­nos do when you ask for direc­tions: “todo directo!” he said, smil­ing and gesturing.

I got back to the car. “He told me to go straight,” I told Feng, who looked at me slightly annoyed. “What’s straight? There are like three roads split­ting here!”

I shrugged in a very Gal­lic way. “Todo directo. Just pick the busiest road.”

We even­tu­ally made it out of Uxmal, stuck behind a bunch of tuk tuks, and found the high­way to Maní. It felt like being in the Amaz­ing Race. At the “pit stop”, we parked and grabbed a bite by the mar­ket. And on the road again. We passed hacien­das, went up the hills and found Uxmal.

Three tour buses were parked in front of a very mod­ern build­ing, an odd­ity in the land­scape. For­tu­nately, the tourists were leav­ing and we had the site almost to ourselves.

Unlike in Cobá, the site was fairly com­pact and not hid­den in the jun­gle. As soon as we entered, we faced the Adi­vino (the Pyra­mid of the Magi­cian) and the ruins. It was the per­fect place to climb, explore and play hide and seek. I let Mark run wild and he couldn’t get enough of it. Even­tu­ally, he passed out in the stroller, exhausted.

We rested a bit and spot­ted the last pyra­mid, from afar, a high struc­ture peek­ing out. “I wish we could climb it,” Feng sighed. “Let’s go!” I replied. “We can take turns.”

And that’s when Mark con­ve­niently woke up. We left the stroller and, once again, I climbed car­ry­ing Mark. He was still sleepy and felt like hug­ging at the top of the pyra­mid, which was nice and com­fort­ing. We sat together and stared into the dis­tance… one of these moments que vale la pena!

You can see the full set of Estación Méx­ico on Flickr.

Maní

Maní

On The Road to Uxmal

On The Road to Uxmal

On The Road to Uxmal

On The Road to Uxmal

On The Road to Uxmal

On The Road to Uxmal

Uman

Uman

Maní

Maní

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

Uxmal

5 comments

  1. Man, you’re really start­ing Mark on becom­ing the next Indi­ana Jones early on! Just a tod­dler and yet he’s already climbed sev­eral Mayan pyra­mids! :D

  2. Oh wow…the moment you described from the top of the pyra­mid gave me tin­gles. It sounds so per­fect. Surely there is noth­ing bet­ter than all being together in that way, doing some­thing unbelievable!

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