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The Food Saga: The Fish Era

Welcome to my “Central and South America Food Saga“!

In Bolivia and in Chile, even though meat was still available, we ate a lot of fish. Good: a break from the arroz con pollo!

Food in Bolivia is quite basic, and there aren’t many supermarkets (if at all). Sanitation isn’t the country’s strong point either, and even though there were many food stalls in La Paz, I skipped on those. However, Copacabana, on the shore of Lake Titicaca, had some of the best fish I have ever had. The popular trucha (trout) can be served al limón (with lemon), entomatada (with tomatoes), al ajillo (with garlic), a la mantequilla (with butter) etc. Typical side dishes include rice or potatoes, with a small salad — not bad!

We stuck to our fish diet in Chile, which has some great seafood thanks to its extensive coastline. Some popular dishes are made with squid, soleidae (sole), albacore, codfish, hake, corvina (salmon), congridae (conger)… Fish can be frito (deep fried in batter), a la plancha (grilled) or al horno (baked).

A great place to eat in Santiago is the Mercado Central, which emphasizes on pescado (fish) and mariscos (shellfish). There are many restaurants and eateries within the market building and the food is cheap, fresh and tasty. Don’t miss the paila marina, a big seafood stew!

Fish Market, Bolivia
Fish Market, Bolivia
Fish Lunch In Santiago, Chile
Fish Lunch In Santiago, Chile
Fisherman In Arica, Chile
Fisherman In Arica, Chile
Fish Restaurants On The Shore Of The Titicaca Lake, Bolivia
Fish Restaurants On The Shore Of The Titicaca Lake, Bolivia
Trucha (Trout) In Copacabana, Bolivia
Trucha (Trout) In Copacabana, Bolivia
Fish Lunch In Santiago, Chile
Fish Lunch In Santiago, Chile
Fish Market, Santiago, Chile
Fish Market, Santiago, Chile
Fish Market, Santiago, Chile
Fish Market, Santiago, Chile

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